The Plant: Café Organic occupies two historic waterfront buildings at Pier 3, The Embarcadero that straddle what was once a railroad passage. It is a full-service, 112-seat restaurant and a separate, counter-service cafe. The 1400-square-foot dining space, originally built in the early 1900s, features 18-foot ceilings, exposed timber structure, and 16-foot-high casement windows that admit natural light and stunning views of the water. The Plant is one of the “greenest” restaurants in San Francisco, and is one of the few in the country with a rooftop solar PV system for on-site, electrical energy production, which is used to power much of the kitchen.

The client’s program called for a sustainable design agenda that would be in sync with, and showcase, the food they are serving. The Plant serves an almost purely organic and primarily locally sources menu, and the space follows similar goals. The Architect inserted light, delicate interiors within the existing pier warehouses, using reclaimed wood, recycled-content tiles and an eclectic mix of zinc, cold-rolled steel, and stainless steel,  to complete the space. San Francisco gardener Flora Grubb created a living wall, installed with air plants, on the cafe’s north wall. The Plant, like many new projects within converted pier buildings along San Francisco’s Embarcadero, is helping revitalize this edge of the city where the land meets the Bay.

the plant: café organic

Location: Pier 3, San Francisco, CA

Type: 4,000 sq ft New Restaurant in a Historic Landmark

Completion: June 2009

Developer: Pacific Waterfront Partners, LLC

 

Architectural Team 

Design Principal: Cass Smith

Project Architect: Sean Kennedy

interior design director: Barbara turpin-vickroy

interior designer: sara klocke

Designers: Sarah Krivanka, Cornelia Sterl

                                                   

Consultants                

Historic Architect: Page & Turnbull

Lighting: Luminesce Design

MEP Engineer: ACIES Engineering

Structural Engineer: John Yadegar & Associates

Food Service: Robert Yick Company, Inc.

Table Tops: Pacassa Studios

Hickory: Arnold and Egan

Graphics:  Ewing Craft

 

General Contractor: Fineline Group

Photography: Kris Tamburello, Kelly Barrie, Melissa Werner

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The Plant: Café Organic occupies two historic waterfront buildings at Pier 3, The Embarcadero that straddle what was once a railroad passage. It is a full-service, 112-seat restaurant and a separate, counter-service cafe. The 1400-square-foot dining space, originally built in the early 1900s, features 18-foot ceilings, exposed timber structure, and 16-foot-high casement windows that admit natural light and stunning views of the water. The Plant is one of the “greenest” restaurants in San Francisco, and is one of the few in the country with a rooftop solar PV system for on-site, electrical energy production, which is used to power much of the kitchen.

The client’s program called for a sustainable design agenda that would be in sync with, and showcase, the food they are serving. The Plant serves an almost purely organic and primarily locally sources menu, and the space follows similar goals. The Architect inserted light, delicate interiors within the existing pier warehouses, using reclaimed wood, recycled-content tiles and an eclectic mix of zinc, cold-rolled steel, and stainless steel,  to complete the space. San Francisco gardener Flora Grubb created a living wall, installed with air plants, on the cafe’s north wall. The Plant, like many new projects within converted pier buildings along San Francisco’s Embarcadero, is helping revitalize this edge of the city where the land meets the Bay.

the plant: café organic

Location: Pier 3, San Francisco, CA

Type: 4,000 sq ft New Restaurant in a Historic Landmark

Completion: June 2009

Developer: Pacific Waterfront Partners, LLC

 

Architectural Team 

Design Principal: Cass Smith

Project Architect: Sean Kennedy

interior design director: Barbara turpin-vickroy

interior designer: sara klocke

Designers: Sarah Krivanka, Cornelia Sterl

                                                   

Consultants                

Historic Architect: Page & Turnbull

Lighting: Luminesce Design

MEP Engineer: ACIES Engineering

Structural Engineer: John Yadegar & Associates

Food Service: Robert Yick Company, Inc.

Table Tops: Pacassa Studios

Hickory: Arnold and Egan

Graphics:  Ewing Craft

 

General Contractor: Fineline Group

Photography: Kris Tamburello, Kelly Barrie, Melissa Werner

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The Plant: Café Organic occupies two historic waterfront buildings at Pier 3, The Embarcadero that straddle what was once a railroad passage. It is a full-service, 112-seat restaurant and a separate, counter-service cafe. The 1400-square-foot dining space, originally built in the early 1900s, features 18-foot ceilings, exposed timber structure, and 16-foot-high casement windows that admit natural light and stunning views of the water. The Plant is one of the “greenest” restaurants in San Francisco, and is one of the few in the country with a rooftop solar PV system for on-site, electrical energy production, which is used to power much of the kitchen.

The client’s program called for a sustainable design agenda that would be in sync with, and showcase, the food they are serving. The Plant serves an almost purely organic and primarily locally sources menu, and the space follows similar goals. The Architect inserted light, delicate interiors within the existing pier warehouses, using reclaimed wood, recycled-content tiles and an eclectic mix of zinc, cold-rolled steel, and stainless steel,  to complete the space. San Francisco gardener Flora Grubb created a living wall, installed with air plants, on the cafe’s north wall. The Plant, like many new projects within converted pier buildings along San Francisco’s Embarcadero, is helping revitalize this edge of the city where the land meets the Bay.

the plant: café organic

Location: Pier 3, San Francisco, CA

Type: 4,000 sq ft New Restaurant in a Historic Landmark

Completion: June 2009

Developer: Pacific Waterfront Partners, LLC

 

Architectural Team 

Design Principal: Cass Smith

Project Architect: Sean Kennedy

interior design director: Barbara turpin-vickroy

interior designer: sara klocke

Designers: Sarah Krivanka, Cornelia Sterl

                                                   

Consultants                

Historic Architect: Page & Turnbull

Lighting: Luminesce Design

MEP Engineer: ACIES Engineering

Structural Engineer: John Yadegar & Associates

Food Service: Robert Yick Company, Inc.

Table Tops: Pacassa Studios

Hickory: Arnold and Egan

Graphics:  Ewing Craft

 

General Contractor: Fineline Group

Photography: Kris Tamburello, Kelly Barrie, Melissa Werner

The Plant: Café OrganicThe Plant: Café Organic restaurant The Plant: Café Organic restaurant design The Plant: Café Organic restaurant decor The Plant: Café Organic restaurant decor ideas The Plant: Café Organic restaurant home decor The Plant: Café Organic restaurant best designer The Plant: Café Organic restaurant architecture The Plant: Café Organic restaurant modern design The Plant: Café Organic restaurant luxury design The Plant: Café Organic restaurant interior architecture

The Plant: Café Organic occupies two historic waterfront buildings at Pier 3, The Embarcadero that straddle what was once a railroad passage. It is a full-service, 112-seat restaurant and a separate, counter-service cafe. The 1400-square-foot dining space, originally built in the early 1900s, features 18-foot ceilings, exposed timber structure, and 16-foot-high casement windows that admit natural light and stunning views of the water. The Plant is one of the “greenest” restaurants in San Francisco, and is one of the few in the country with a rooftop solar PV system for on-site, electrical energy production, which is used to power much of the kitchen.

The client’s program called for a sustainable design agenda that would be in sync with, and showcase, the food they are serving. The Plant serves an almost purely organic and primarily locally sources menu, and the space follows similar goals. The Architect inserted light, delicate interiors within the existing pier warehouses, using reclaimed wood, recycled-content tiles and an eclectic mix of zinc, cold-rolled steel, and stainless steel,  to complete the space. San Francisco gardener Flora Grubb created a living wall, installed with air plants, on the cafe’s north wall. The Plant, like many new projects within converted pier buildings along San Francisco’s Embarcadero, is helping revitalize this edge of the city where the land meets the Bay.

the plant: café organic

Location: Pier 3, San Francisco, CA

Type: 4,000 sq ft New Restaurant in a Historic Landmark

Completion: June 2009

Developer: Pacific Waterfront Partners, LLC

 

Architectural Team 

Design Principal: Cass Smith

Project Architect: Sean Kennedy

interior design director: Barbara turpin-vickroy

interior designer: sara klocke

Designers: Sarah Krivanka, Cornelia Sterl

                                                   

Consultants                

Historic Architect: Page & Turnbull

Lighting: Luminesce Design

MEP Engineer: ACIES Engineering

Structural Engineer: John Yadegar & Associates

Food Service: Robert Yick Company, Inc.

Table Tops: Pacassa Studios

Hickory: Arnold and Egan

Graphics:  Ewing Craft

 

General Contractor: Fineline Group

Photography: Kris Tamburello, Kelly Barrie, Melissa Werner

25

the plant: café organic

Location: Pier 3, San Francisco, CA

Type: 4,000 sq ft New Restaurant in a Historic Landmark

Completion: June 2009

Developer: Pacific Waterfront Partners, LLC

 

Architectural Team 

Design Principal: Cass Smith

Project Architect: Sean Kennedy

interior design director: Barbara turpin-vickroy

interior designer: sara klocke

Designers: Sarah Krivanka, Cornelia Sterl

                                                   

Consultants                

Historic Architect: Page & Turnbull

Lighting: Luminesce Design

MEP Engineer: ACIES Engineering

Structural Engineer: John Yadegar & Associates

Food Service: Robert Yick Company, Inc.

Table Tops: Pacassa Studios

Hickory: Arnold and Egan

Graphics:  Ewing Craft

 

General Contractor: Fineline Group

Photography: Kris Tamburello, Kelly Barrie, Melissa Werner

The Plant: Café Organic occupies two historic waterfront buildings at Pier 3, The Embarcadero that straddle what was once a railroad passage. It is a full-service, 112-seat restaurant and a separate, counter-service cafe. The 1400-square-foot dining space, originally built in the early 1900s, features 18-foot ceilings, exposed timber structure, and 16-foot-high casement windows that admit natural light and stunning views of the water. The Plant is one of the “greenest” restaurants in San Francisco, and is one of the few in the country with a rooftop solar PV system for on-site, electrical energy production, which is used to power much of the kitchen.

The client’s program called for a sustainable design agenda that would be in sync with, and showcase, the food they are serving. The Plant serves an almost purely organic and primarily locally sources menu, and the space follows similar goals. The Architect inserted light, delicate interiors within the existing pier warehouses, using reclaimed wood, recycled-content tiles and an eclectic mix of zinc, cold-rolled steel, and stainless steel,  to complete the space. San Francisco gardener Flora Grubb created a living wall, installed with air plants, on the cafe’s north wall. The Plant, like many new projects within converted pier buildings along San Francisco’s Embarcadero, is helping revitalize this edge of the city where the land meets the Bay.

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